Nuclear Reading List

It’s hard to keep up with a global industry. Here are some sources to help with the task

One thing I learned in the many years that I published my nuclear energy blog is that there can be too much nuclear information.  This lesson was brought home with the mind-crushing rush of information that hit the wires during the height of the Fukushima crisis.  But what about keeping up with the news on the nuclear industry in ordinary times?

If your employer can afford it, your firm subscribes to one or more of the specialty newsletters that tap in at $2,000 or more per year for a subscription.  In return, readers get detailed, expert news and analysis that would never, ever show up in the mainstream news media.  I worked for such a specialty newsletter for five years and remain grateful for subscriber support since it meant the difference, metaphorically speaking, between a having a roof over my head and sleeping under a bridge.

However, because of copyright restrictions, most of these newsletters contain web beacons or other electronic devices that are designed to stop a firm from buying one subscription and then emailing each issue to its employees.  While there is the copy machine dodge, that is so 20th century.  Plus, waiting for the inter-office mail to deliver a bootleg copy puts you one day behind your electronically wired-in colleagues.

So, what’s a nuclear pro to do to stay current without shelling out the equivalent of a new car lease down payment?  The answer is there are a number of free news services available on the Internet that can go a long way to keep your mental inbox full of interesting stuff.  Here’s a short list of free sources.

Online services

Nuclear Town Hall – This is a seven-day-a-week, and twice-a-day on weekdays, summary of links to business and political news about nuclear energy.  Based in Washington, DC, it has a global perspective and also a special section on nuclear energy OP EDs and opinion pieces.  Resolutely pro-nuclear in every respect it even cites nuclear bloggers when it sees something of interest.  You can read the updates on the website or subscribe to it by email.

World Nuclear News – This is a five-day-a-week service that publishes short news reports about the global nuclear industry. Based on London, it is available on the website, or via email delivery by the time U.S. readers are pouring their second cup of coffee. A searchable archive allows readers to dig into the background of breaking news.

NEI Smart Brief – Sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Institute, it picks up news clips from the mainstream media and posts a brief summary of about half a dozen of them a day with links to the original source online.  The brief is published weekdays except major holidays.

NucNet – NucNet is an independent global news and information network for the international nuclear community. NucNet maintains a 24-hour-7-day service to report the facts behind nuclear-related news. NucNet collects and shares information and news on nuclear issues, particularly all aspects of the safe operation of nuclear installations and the safe use of ionizing radiation.

Nuclear Power Daily – Like NEI Smartbrief, this daily nuclear news summary relies on wire services and other sources.  Like NEI Smartbrief, it is an advertising supported service.

Google News – Google News allow you to search by keywords and to set up news alerts based on them.  You can set up as many alerts as you want and have the alerts delivered by email or RSS feed.  You can select instant delivery or once a day.

Nuclear Energy blogs are a great source of information often posting news in specialized developments days or weeks ahead of the mainstream news media.  A good starting place is the blog roll list of links on this blog or on ANS Nuclear Cafe.

Books

There is another “what to read” issue, and that is how to answer questions from in-laws, friends, and the occasional non-nuclear colleagues who genuinely want to know more about nuclear energy.  Here’s a reading list that you can clip and save.  All of these books are in print and most can be found in a public library or through interlibrary loan.  The major online book selling services stock these volumes.

Three must reads – Start here

The Power to Save the World: The Truth About Nuclear Energy, by Gwyneth Cravens

Terrestrial Energy: How Nuclear Energy Will Lead the Green Revolution and End America’s Energy Odyssey, by William Tucker

Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto, by Stewart Brand

Recommended reading for generalists

Nuclear Energy: What Everyone Needs to Know, by Charles D. Ferguson

Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century, by Ian Hore-Lacy

Seeing the Light: The Case for Nuclear Power in the 21st Century, by Scott L. Montgomery

The Reporter’s Handbook on Nuclear Materials, Energy, and Waste Management, by Michael Greenberg et.al

Histories

Nuclear Firsts: Milestone on the Road to Nuclear Power Development, by Gail Marcus

The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made a Difference, by Ted Rockwell

Plentiful Energy: The Story of the Integral Fast Reactor, by Charles E. Till and Yoon Il Chang

Nuclear Silk Road: The Koreanization of Nuclear Power Technology, by Byung-Koo Kim

Nonproliferation

Physics for Future Presidents, by Richard A. Muller

The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes

The Spread of Nuclear Weapons, by Scott D. Sagan and Kenneth N. Waltz

Single Issues

Radiation and Reason, by Wade Allison

Uranium: War, Energy and the Rock that Shaped the World, by Tom Zoellner

Thorium Energy, Cheaper than Coal, Robert Hargraves

Super Fuel; Thorium, the Green Energy Source for the Future, Richard Martin

Nuclear Waste Reading List – by Sam Brinton

Sustainable Development / Climate Change / Environment / Advocacy

Storms of my Grandchildren, by James Hansen

The GeoPolitics of Energy: Achieving a Just and Sustainable Energy Distribution by 2040, by Judith Wright and James Conca

Sustainable Energy – Without The Hot Air, by David JC MacKay

Why We Need Nuclear Power – the Environmental Case – Michael H. Fox

Campaigning for Clean Air: Strategies for Pro-Nuclear Advocacy – Meredith Angwin

Government Reports

Spent Nuclear Fuel – In an email exchange in August 2016 with Sam Brinton, Senior Policy Analyst at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington, DC, he suggests that good a starting point to understand spent nuclear fuel is the Blue Ribbon Commission report which is a useful volume. It is an excellent report and is accessible, for the most part, for people who have no technical background in nuclear energy.

Here is a brief summary.

BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ON AMERICA’S NUCLEAR FUTURE
REPORT TO THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY

The Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future (BRC) was formed by the Secretary of Energy at the request of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new strategy. It was cochaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft.

The Commission and its subcommittees met more than two dozen times between March 2010 and January 2012 to hear testimony from experts and stakeholders, to visit nuclear waste management facilities in the United States and abroad, and to discuss the issues identified in its Charter.

Additionally, in 2011, the Commission held five public meetings, in different regions of the country, to hear feedback on its draft report. A wide variety of organizations, interest groups, and individuals provided input to the Commission at these meetings and through the submission of written materials.

This report highlights the Commission’s findings and conclusions and presents recommendations for consideration by the Administration and Congress, as well as interested state, tribal and local governments, other stakeholders, and the public.

In 2016 the Department of Energy is pursuing a “consent based” approach to locating a site for final disposition for spent nuclear fuel.

& & &

If you have a favorite news source, or best book on nuclear energy, please post your suggestions in the comments or send me a Tweet @djysrv

13 Responses to Nuclear Reading List

  1. Eric Schmitz says:

    I found “Nuclear 2.0” by Mark Lynas interesting, easy to read, and well-sourced. Just a couple bucks on Kindle.

    Like

  2. Todd De Ryck says:

    Technical examination of energy return on energy invested “Energy in Australia” http://bravenewclimate.com/2014/02/09/book-review-energy-in-australia/

    Quick read with many (I believe) credible references Greenjacked! http://www.amazon.com/GreenJacked-derailing-environmental-action-climate-ebook/dp/B00MN7UPH6/ref=sr_1_1

    Good overview of the pros and cons of all electricity generation sources “Why We Need Nuclear Power – The Environmental Case” Oxford University press http://blog.oup.com/2014/08/environmental-case-nuclear-power/

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Nuclear Reading List | A Public Eye on Energy

  4. Edward Kee says:

    Dan:

    Robert Bryce has written a few books, including “Power Hungry” and “Smaller, Faster, Lighter, Denser, Cheaper”

    Kim Byung-Koo’s book on the South Korean nuclear industrial development effort, “Nuclear Silk Road”

    Rupp and Derian’s “Light Water” presents a view about technology dominance of light water reactors – this is old and out of print, but worth a read

    Thomas Neff’s “The International Uranium Market” is also out of print, but still a good read

    Ian Bremmer’s “The End of the Free Market” is not a nuclear book, but provides an excellent overview of the rise of state capitalism that is seen in government nuclear vendors

    Like

  5. Dan:
    I just finished another book that should be on the list:

    Why We Need Nuclear Power: The Environmental Case, by Michael H. Fox

    Like

  6. Michael Mann says:

    Atomic Accidents, A history of nuclear meltdowns and disasters from the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima by James Mahaffey would be a great addition to the “Histories” list

    Like

  7. virgilfenn says:

    Leslie Corrice deserves more than an honorable mention for his chronicle.
    http://hiroshimasyndrome.com/fukushima-the-first-five-days.html

    Like

  8. Pingback: Nuclear Reading List | Energy post

  9. Chris Bergan says:

    The online library at WNA has a new section which looks like an excellent primer for nuclear energy – they also update articles quarterly so this info should remain current.
    http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Current-and-Future-Generation/

    Like

  10. Pingback: Welcome Post | Neutron Bytes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s